Springtime in Yorkshire

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The cliffs of Flamborough Head

Walking along the wide expanse of Fraisthorpe Sands was easy as we headed north towards Bridlington.  I meandered along the beach doing a spot of beach combing, finding beautiful stones and shells, watching the oyster catchers feeding on the shoreline and a flock of sanderlings flying in formation.  A group of three horses were ridden through the waves and wind surfers were enjoying the surf.  We explored the old look-outs that had slipped on to the beach as the soft clay erodes.  A beach is never dull.  After hot chocolate in Bridlington we returned, now walking in to the wind and I was bent over to avoid the wind in my eyes.  I found a discarded plastic bag in the surf and filled it with plastic bottles and other litter as we got closer to the ‘van.

Earlier in the day we had stopped at the village of Rudston to see the stunning tall Neolithic monolith in the churchyard and the graves to Winifred Holtby and the MacDonalds of Sleat.  We had camped in an idyllic small site south east of York, no facilities or electric but a view of a small lake.  We had watched a group of tufted ducks diving and moving purposefully as we had breakfast.

From Bridlington we walked to Flamborough Head, the path hugging the line of the cliffs.  Showers rushed in as we reached the lighthouse and we sheltered in the cafe before going down to the sea.  The white cliffs were shining and stunning after the rain and we watched two seals bobbing n the bay. Following the cliff path to North Landing we spotted elegant gannets flying in formation over the surf and guillemots, fulmars and kittiwakes lined up on the cliffs.  Another shower came in and we were lucky to just catch the hourly bus back to our campsite.

After an evening of rain, clear skies came and we woke to sunshine.  We drove to Pickering and Cawthorne Roman Camp.  The ditches and banks of this vast site on the edge of the North Yorkshire Moors are impressive.  From here we followed paths through woodland, fields and moors on a nine mile walk, much of our route on the Tabular Hills Walk, an intriguing name that comes from their distinctive table-top shape.

Our trip had taken us through swathes of snowdrops and bright daffodils just starting to flower but it was a mammal that made me really feel like it was spring.  It was the first day of March while we were away and that morning we spotted our first brown hare of the year gracefully lolloping around the field we were camped in.  These fast-moving and beautiful animals came to the UK with the Romans and are always joyful to watch.  For me the March hare always feels like a real herald of springtime.

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Author: memorialbenchstories

I am interested in the stories behind the people commemorated in memorial benches. I come across these benches in different places and they always make me wonder. Do get in touch if you have any stories.

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