A labyrinth is a symbolic journey

2011 March Grassington signpost with grid reference
A map always helps to decide which way to go

I love maps!  I gaze at them and imagine journeys I can take and try and picture the places they represent.  My fingers follow the patterns of the paths, rivers and ridges and how these affect the pattern of the towns and villages.  For me, maps open up possibilities and going out with a map gives me the confidence to explore; this also means that without a map I feel a bit lost and all-at-sea.

I like to think of our plan for early retirement and financial independence as a map.  This map also has a path I am wandering along but the benefit of the map is that I can spot the opportunities for short-cuts and longer more scenic routes, should I fancy deviating from the path.  This map gives me confidence and the ability to be flexible around the route Mr BOTRA and I have mapped out and with this map I am hopeful that I won’t end up in a dead end or get lost along the way.

And so, not surprisingly, I love the look of these literary maps.  They are designed as a sort of mobile and self-taught creative writing course, with exercises to help a writer explore a particular environment.  There is a writing map for the city, for cafes and bookshops, for writing by the sea and in crowded places  and others.  Each map is designed by a different person and is a beautiful item to own and look at and make use of.  I am hoping someone buys at least one for me some time soon.

As a travel writer and a blog writer I am not too proud to take any help I can get.  I get loads of inspiration from other people’s blogs, from conversations with other people, from observation and from reading.  These literary maps look like a great way to initiate the generation of new ideas in my brain.  Take a look and let me know how you find inspiration for your ideas, projects and writing.

A quick word on the quote I have used: “A labyrinth is a symbolic journey . . . but it is a map we can really walk on, blurring the difference between map and world.” From Rebecca Solnit wonderful book Wanderlust: A History of Walking.

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Author: memorialbenchstories

I am interested in the stories behind the people commemorated in memorial benches. I come across these benches in different places and they always make me wonder. Do get in touch if you have any stories.

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